Prayer

St. Paul’s is a community who prays. Our prayers are said in community and privately from the depths of our hearts. We are strengthened by the supportive and healing prayers of others on our behalf.
As Episcopalians, an important part of our worship tradition is the Daily Office. The Daily Office marks the day in prayer: Morning Prayer, Noonday Prayer, Evening Prayer, and Compline. The Daily Office can be said by communities in the context of a service, or by individuals.

All requests for prayer are listed in the published prayer list for one month. If you wish for continued prayer, please notify the church office. We pray for congregation members on Sundays during the Prayers of the People and publish a prayer list in the Sunday bulletin. Daughters of the King also prays for those on the list.

United Thank Offering (UTO)

The United Thank Offering of The Episcopal Church is a personal spiritual discipline of thanksgiving that supports God’s mission throughout the world. Through daily prayer and tangible offerings, lives are changed in very real ways.

How it works: Give thanks to God for the good things that happen each day. As you give thanks, make an offering for each blessing. Put some coins or dollars into your UTO Blue Box, or drop a reminder note in the box for later counting. Your blessings then become blessings to others when your thankful dimes, quarters and dollars are united with the prayers and offerings of others from across The Episcopal Church. These funds are distributed through awarded grants that support mission and ministry throughout The Episcopal Church and invited Provinces of the Anglican Communion.

Pick up a UTO Blue Box from the display in the Narthex or the display in the Parish House hallway and begin counting your blessings today. For information about United Thank Offering resources and grants, visit here.

Labyrinths

A labyrinth is one of the oldest man-man symbols composed of a circle and a spiral going back thousands of years. It has been found on cave walls, clay tablets, coins, vases across cultures, and geography, and time. It has been used as a meditation/prayer aid for centuries.

It is a symbol of wholeness. It is a single path to the center, and a single path out. It is a metaphor for life’s journey to our own center and back again.

Here is a link to the booklet “How to Walk a Labyrinth,” a recording of St. Paul’s member Steve Martin reading a labyrinth visualization. Contact Steve at itsstevemartin@yahoo.comor (910) 228-4841 if you want to learn more about labyrinths.

Labyrinths in the Wilmington Area

Prayer Requests

  • CARD: Complete the “Request for Prayer” pew card and leave in the offering plate.
  • Fill out the online card here.
  • EMAIL to be placed on the prayer list.
  • CALL the church office at: (910) 762-4578.

This Week’s
Prayer Requests

Fr. John Cawthorne
Joyce Connelly
Herb Gant
David Heath
William Murphy
Bill Petry
Sally Roberts
Jere Lewis
Joann Summey
Mack Umphlett
Ralph Tilden
Pat Whitehead
Hilda Robinson
Fred Wilson